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Category Archive for 'emotions'

How should you do a neuromarketing test? I’m increasingly being asked whether the scales from the Emotiv EPOC Affective™ Suite system can be used to assess cognitive and emotional responses in e.g. customers. After all, it would be really appealing if we could use a full box set with responses such as Engagement, Meditation, Frustration and [...]

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While work by people such as Diederik Stapel has been deemed fraudulent, research into the effects of contexts on thinking and behavior has almost come to a halt. There has been much skepticism towards whether there are any effects at all. Could it still be the case that context can affect our emotional responses and judgments [...]

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I have recently become aware of the news that a company has patented regional brain responses to “appeal” and “engagement”. Through the scarcity of the material presented, it is really hard to get an idea of what the patent really entails. But from the sound of it, we are suggested that the patent is about [...]

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Deepak Chopra has moved into the domain of the brain… and it should come as no surprise that what he claims is not only laughably erroneous, but also deeply misleading and ignoring the vast amounts of data for the view he so eagerly wants to discard. Why do I even bother? Because I care! I [...]

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Do the gory warning pictures put on cigarette packages work? Do  disgusting images work as intended? Health warnings are indeed a hot issue these days, and one particular theme on the use of gory images of health related diseases and disorders that stem from smoking. One can understand the basic intention of such warnings: scare [...]

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What is the effect of thinking about your mortality on your willingness to accept evolutionary theory? In a new study just published in PLoS ONE, researchers Jessica Tracy, Joshua Hart and Jason Martens report that, throughout four different studies, reminding subjects of their mortality made them more prone to reject evolutionary theory, and/or accept claims [...]

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In a recent article in Science (also reported here), researchers report that faces coupled with negative stories (e.g. having thrown a chair at a classmate) led to an increase in visual attention to that person. Other kinds of stories, from neutral to positive, did not produce such an effect. This is taken as an indication [...]

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Can our social judgements and prejudice be influenced by non-social factors? In a neat study recently published in Science, researchers demonstrate just this: prejudice increases with the level of visual disorder. Diederik Stapel and Siegwart Lindenberg from Tilburg University asked volunteers to fill out questionnaires that probed their attitudes towards certain social minorities, and where [...]

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An already influential paper by Salimpoor et al. in Nature Neuroscience, suggests that we need to rethink how the reward system works, most notably the neural distinction between expectation and experience of rewards. By using PET scanning to probe the binding of dopamine in the (subcortical) brain, and using fMRI to learn more about the [...]

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We’re preparing projects on nostalgia, and nostalgic products. And, just as with any other folkish concept, you start to wonder just about the exact meaning about that word. What does ‘nostalgia’ really mean. Thanks to Daniel Barratt for the link -Thomas

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