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Readings in Neuroethics

This list collects academic writings on the topic of neuroethics. For whose new to the field we recommend Martha Farah's two short papers as an introduction (Farah 2002 and 2005). The best single introduction to the various problems of neuroethics is Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics (Oxford University Press 2006). Volume 50, issue 3, of Brain and Cognition deals specifically with ethical issues raised by neuroimaging.

The list is continuosly updated. So, if you are familar with any papers or books not presently on the list, please email us: martins_AT_drcmr_DOT_dk.


 

Albert, M. (2002): Ethical challenges in Alzheimer’s disease. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Alper, J. (1998): Genes, free will, and criminal responsibility. Social Science and Medicine 46: 1599-1611.

Anand, S. & Hotson, J. (2002): Transcranial magnetic stimulation: Neurophysiological applications and safety. Brain and Cognition 50: 366-386.

 

Baird, A. & Fugelsang, J. (2004): The emergence of consequential thought: Evidence from neuroscience. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1797-1804.

Bernat, J. (2002): Ethical issues in neurology. Boston, MA: Butterworth Heinemann.

Berthoz, S. et al. (In press): Affective response to one’s own moral violations. NeuroImage.

Buller, T. (2005): Can we scan for truth in a society of liars? American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2): 58-60.

Buller, T. (2006a): Brains, lies, and psychological explanations. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Buller, T. (2006b). What can neuroscience contribute to ethics? Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2): 63-64.

 

Canli, T. & Amin, Z. (2002): Neuroimaging of emotion and personality: Scientific evidence and ethical considerations. Brain and Cognition 50: 414-431.

Canli, T. et al. (2001): An fMRI study of personality influences on brain activity to emotional stimuli. Behavioral Neuroscience 114: 33-42.

Canli, T. (2006): When genes and brains unite: Ethical implications of genomic neuroimaging. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Caplan, A. (2002): No brainer: Can we cope with the ethical ramifications of new knowledge of the brain? In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Casebeer, W. (2003a): Moral cognition and its neural constituents. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 841-847.

Casebeer, W. (2003b): Natural Ethical Facts: Evolution,Connectionism,and Moral Cognition. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Casebeer, W & Churchland, PS (2003): The neural mechanisms of moral cognition. Biology and Philosophy 18: 169-194.

Caspi, A. et al. (2002): Role of genotype in the cycle of violence in maltreated children. Science 297: 851-854.

Chatterjee, A. (2004): Cosmetic neurology: The controversy over enhancing movement, mentation, and mood. Neurology 63: 968-974.

Chorcat, T. & McCabe, K. (2004): The brain and the law. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1727-1736.

Churchland, PM. (1998): Toward a cognitive neurobiology of the moral virtues. Topoi 17: 83-96.

Churchland, PS (2002): Brain-Wise. Cambridge, MA: MIT.

Churchland, PS (2002): Neuroconscience: Reflections on the neural basis of morality. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Churchland, PS (2006): Moral decision-making and the brain. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Damasio, A. (2002): The neural basis of social behaviour. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

De Waal, F. (1996): Good Natured. The Origin of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals. Cambridge: Harvard UP.

Delgado, J. (1969): Physical control of the mind. New York: Harper and Row.

Desmond, J. & Glover, G. (2002): Ethical issues in the clinical application of fMRI: Factors affecting the validity and interpretations of activations. Brain and Cognition 50: 482-497.

Eastman, N. & Campbell, C. (2006): Neuroscience and the legal determination of criminal responsibility. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 7: 311-318.

Eslinger, P. et al. (2002): Emotional and cognitive processing in empathy and moral behavior. Behav Brain Sci.Farah, M. (2002): Emerging ethical issues in neuroscience. Nature Neuroscience 5: 1123-1129.

 

Farah, M. (2005): Neuroethics: The practical and the philosophical. Trends in Cognitive Science 9: 34-40.

Farah, M., Noble, K. & Hurt, H. (2006): Poverty, privilege, and brain development: Empirical findings and ethical implications. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Farah, M. & Wolpe, P. (2004): Monitoring and manipulating brain function: New neuroscience technologies and their ethical implications. Hastings Center Report 34: 34-45.

Farah, M. et al. (2004): Neurocognitive enhancement: What can we do and what should we do? Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5: 421-425.

Feldman, R. & Goodrich, J. (2001): Psychosurgery: A historical overview. Neurosurgery 48: 647-659.

Fins, J. (2000): A proposed ethical framework for interventional cognitive neuroscience: A consideration of deep brain stimulation in impaired consciousness. Neurological Research 22: 273-278.

Fins, J. (2003): From psychosurgery to neuromodulation and palliation: History’s lessons for the ethical conduct and regulation of neuropsychiatric research. Neurosurgery Clinics of North America 14: 303-319.

Ford, P. & Henderson, J. (2006): Functional neurosurgical intervention: neuroethics in the operating room. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Foster, K. (2006): Engineering the brain. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Fugelsang, J. & Dunbar, K. (2004): A cognitive neuroscience framework for understanding causal reasoning and the law. . Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1749-1754

 

Garland, B., ed. (2004): Neuroscience and the law. New York: Dana Press.

Gazzania, M. (2005): The ethical brain. New York: Dana Press

Gazzaniga, M. (2006): Facts, fictions and the future of neuroethics. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Goodenough, O. & Prehn, K. (2004): A neuroscientific approach to normative judgment in law and justice. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1709-1726.

Goswami, U. (2004): Neuroscience and education. British Journal of Educational Psychology 74: 1-14.

Goswami, U. (2006): Neuroscience and education: From research to practice. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 7: 406-413.

Grainger-Monsen, M. & Karetsky, K. (2006): The mind in the movies: A neuroethical analysis of the portrayal of the mind in popular media. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Gray, J. & Thompson, P. (2004): Neurobiology of intelligence: Science and ethics. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5: 471-482.

Greely, H. (2002): Neuroethics and ELSI. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Greely, H. (2004): Prediction, litigation, privacy, and property: Some possible legal and social implications of advances in neuroscience. In Garland, B., ed. (2004): Neuroscience and the law. New York: Dana Press.

Greely, H. (2006): The social effects of advance in neuroscience: Legal problems, legal perspectives. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Green, R. (2006): From genome to brainome: Charting the lessonslearned. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Greene, J. (2002): The terrible, horrible, no good, very bad truth abouth morality and what to do about it. PhD Thesis. Princeton University.

Greene, J. (2003): From neural ’is’ to moral ’ought’: what are the moral implications of neuroscientific moral psychology? Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 847-850.

Greene, J. (2005a). Emotion and cognition in moral judgment: evidence from neuroimaging. In Neurobiology of Human Values, J.P. Changeux, A.R. Damasio, W. Singer, and Y. Christen, Eds., Springer-Verlag, Berlin.

Greene, J. (2005b). Cognitive neuroscience and the structure of the moral mind. In The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents, S. Laurence, P. Carruthers,. and S. Stich. Eds., Oxford University Press, New York.

Greene, J. D. (in press). The secret joke of Kant’s soul, in Moral Psychology, Vol. 3: The Neuroscience of Morality, W. Sinnott-Armstrong, Ed., MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

Greene, J. et al. (2001): An fMRI Investigation of Emotional Engagement in Moral Judgment. Science 293: 2105-2108.

Greene, J. et al. (2004): The neural bases of cognitive conflict and control in moral judgment. Neuron 44: 389-400.

Greene, J. & Haidt, J. (2002): How (and where) does moral judgment work? Trends in Cognitive Science 6: 517-523.

Greene, J. & Cohen, J. (2004): For the law, neuroscience changes nothing and everything. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1775-1885.

 

Hauser, M. (In press): Moral Minds. New York: Harper Collins.

Haidt, J. (2001): The emotional dog and its rational tail. Psychological Review 108: 814-834.

Haidt J (2002) The moral emotions. In R. Davidson et al. (eds.): Handbook of affective sciences. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Heekeren, H. et al. (2003): An fMRI study of simple ethical decision-making. NeuroReport 14: 1215-1219.

Heekeren, H. et al. (2005): Influence of bodily harm on neural correlates of semantic and moral decision-making. NeuroImage 24: 887-897.

Hinton, V. (2002): Ethics of neuroimaging in pediatric development. Brain and Cognition 50: 455-468.

Hyman, S. (2002): Ethical issues in pharmacology. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

 

Illes, J. (2003): Neuroethics in a new area of neuroimaging. American Journal of Neuroradiology 24: 1739-1741.

Illes, J. (2004): A fish story? Brain maps, lie detection and personhood. Cerebrum 6: 73-80.

Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Illes, J., Gallo, M. & Kirschen, M. (In press): An ethics perspective on the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for human neuromodulatio. Behavioral Neurology.

Illes, J., Kirschen, M. & Gabrieli, J. (2003): From neuroimaging to neuroethics. Nature Neuroscience 6: 205.

Illes, j& Racine, E. (2005): Imaging or imagining? A neuroethics challenge informed by genetics. American Journal of Bioethics 5: 1-14.

Illes, J., Racine. E. & Kirschen, M. (2006): A picture is worth 1000 words, but which 1000? In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Illes, J. & Raffin, T (2002): Neuroethics: A new discipline is emerging in the study of brain and cognition. Brain and Cognition 50: 341-344.

Illes, J. & Raffin, T. (In press): No child left withot a brain scan? A model for pediatric neuroethics. Cerebrum.

Illes, J. et al. (2004): Ethical consideration of incidental findings on the human brain. Neurology 62: 849-850.

Illes, J. et al. (2002): Ethical and practical considerations in managing incidental findings in functional magnetic resonance imaging. Brain and Cognition 50: 358-365.

 

Jaworska, A. (2006): Ethical dilemmas in neurodegenerative disease: Respecting patients at the twilight of agency. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Jones, O. (2004): Law, evolution and the brain: Applications and open questions. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1697-1707.

Jonsen, A. (2002): Brain science and self. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

 

Kennedy, D. (2006): Neuroethics: Mapping a new interdiscipline. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Kim, B. et al. (2002): Incidental findings on pediatric MR images of the brain. American Journal of Neuroradiology 23: 1674-1677.

King, J. et al. (2005): Doing the right thing: A common neural circuit for appropriate violent or compassionate behaviour. NeuroImage 30: 1069-1076.

Klitzman, R. (2006): Clinicians, patients, and the brain. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Kulynych, J (2002): Legal and ethical issues in neuroimaging research. Brain and Cognition 50: 345-357.

 

Langleben, D. et al. (2002): Brain activity during simulated deception: An event-related fMRI study. NeuroImage 15: 727-732.

Leentjens, A. et al. (2004): Manipulation of mental competence: An ethical problem in case of electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for severe Parkinson’s disease. Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde 148: 1394-1398.

Levine, D. (2002): MR imaging of fetal central nervous system abnormalities. Brain and Cognition 50: 432-448.

Libet, B. (1999): Do we have a free will? Journal of Consciousness Studies 6: 45.

Loftus, E. (2003): Our changeable memories: Legal and practical implications. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 231-233.

Luo, Q. et al. (2005): The neural basis of implicit moral attitude – An IAT study using event-related fMRI. NeuroImage 30: 1449-1457.

Lynch, G. (2002): Memory enhancement: The search for mechanism-based drugs. Nature Neuroscience 5 (suppl.): 1035-1038

 

McGee, E. & Maguire, G. (2001): Implantable brain chips: Ethical and policy issues. Medical Ethics 1-2: 8.

Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Miller, F. & Fins, J. (2006): Protecting human subjects in brain research: A pragmatic perspective. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Moll, J. (2003): Morals and the human brain: a working model. Neuroreport 14: 299-305.

Moll, J. et al. (2001): Frontopolar and anterior temporal cortex activation in a moral judgment task: preliminary functional MRI results in normal subjects. Arq Neuropsiquiatr 59: 657–664.

Moll, J. et al. (2002a): The Neural Correlates of Moral Sensitivity: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Basic and Moral Emotions. The Journal of Neuroscience 22: 2730–2736.

Moll, J. et al. (2002b): Functional networks in emotional moral and nonmoral social judgments. NeuroImage 16: 696-703.

Moll, J. et al. (2005): The neural basis of human moral cognition. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 6: 799-809.

Moreno, J. (2002): Gaging ethics. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Moreno, J. (2003): Neuroethics: An agenda for neuroscience and society. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 149-153.

Morse, S. (2006): Moral and legal responsibility and the new neuroscience. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

 

Noble, K., Norman, M. & Farah, M. (2005): Neurocognitive correlates of socioeconomic status in kindergarten children. Developmental Science 8: 74-87.

 

Parens, E. (1998): Enhancing human traits: Ethical and social implications. Washinton, DC: Georgetown UP.

Parens, E. (2002): How far will the term enhancement get us as we grapple with new ways to shape our selves? In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Parens, E. (2006): Creativity, gratitude, and the enhancement debate. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

 

Racine, E., Bar-Ilan, O. & Illes, J. (2005): fMRI in the public eye. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 6: 9-14.

Rosen, A. & Gur, R. (2002): Ethical considerations for neuropsychologists as functional magnetic imagers. Brain and Cognition 50: 469-481.

Rosen, A. et al. (2002): Ethical and practical issues in applying functional imaging to the clinical management of Alzheimer’s disease. Brain and Cognition 50: 498-519.

Roskies, A. (2002): Neuroethics for the new millennium. Neuron 35:21-23.

Roskies, A. (2003): Are ethical judgments intrinsically motivational? Philosophical Psychology 16: 51-66.

Roskies, A. (2006): A case study of neuroethics: The nature of moral judgment. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

 

Sapolsky, R. (2004): The frontal cortex and the criminal justice system. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1787-1796.

Schacter, D. (2002): The seven sins of memory. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Schaffner, K. (2002): Neuroethics: Reductionism, emergence, and decision-making capacities. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Sheridan, K., Zinchenko, E.& Gardner, H. (2006): Neuroethics in education. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Schiff, N., Plum, F. & Rezai, A. (2002): Developing prosthetics to treat cognitive disabilities resulting from acquired brain injuries. Neurological Research 24: 116-124.

Silva, G. (2006): Neuroscience nanotechnology: Progress, opportunities and challenges. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 7: 65-74.

Spence, S. et al. (2004): A cognitive neurobiological account of deception: Evidence from functional neuroimaging. Philsophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 359: 1755-1762.

Stevens, M. & Pascual-Leone, A. (2006): Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain: An ethical evaluation. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Stevenson, D. & Goldworth, A. (2002): Ethical considerations in neuroimaging and its impact on decision-makng for neonates. Brain and Cognition 50: 49-454.

 

Tancredi, L. (2005): Hardwired behavior: What neuroscience reveals about morality. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

 

Van Praag, H., Kempermann, G. & Gage, F. (2000): Neural consequences of environmental enrichment. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 1: 191-198.

Waldbauer, J. & Gazzaniga, M. (2001): The divergence of neuroscience and law. Jurimetrics 41: 357-364.

Winslade, W. (2002): Traumatic brain injury and legal responsibility. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Wolpe, P. (2002): Neurotechnolgy, Cyborgs, and the sense of self. In Marcus, S. (2002): Neuroethics. Mappng the field. New York: Dana Press.

Wolpe, P. 2002b): Treatment, enhancement, and the ethics of neurotherapeutics. Brain and Cognition 50: 387-395.

Wolpe, P. (2006): Religious responses to neuroscientific questions. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

Wolpe, P., Langleben, D. & Foster, K. (2005): Emerging neurotechnologies for lie detection: Promises and perils. American Journal of Bioethics 5: 15-26.

 

Zoloth, L. (2006): Being in the world: Neuroscience and the ethical agent. In Illes, J., ed. (2006): Neuroethics. Oxford: Oxford UP.

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