How they voted: electric vehicles by the 2030 mandate, drug possession legislation and mandatory racism training in schools


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By WashingtonVotes.org

While negotiations on the budget proposals passed by the two chambers continue behind closed doors, action on the ground in both chambers revolves mainly around the approval and final passage of the bills that were amended in the other bedroom. Lawmakers must agree to these amendments before a final vote on a bill. If they disagree – or “agree” – on an amendment, the bill is said to be “in dispute” and a small “conference committee” is appointed by legislative leaders to iron out differences beforehand. that the bill not be resubmitted for final passage. Among the bills that received a final vote after passage is HB 1287, which sets a goal that all passenger and light utility vehicles of model year 2030 or higher sold in Washington State be electric vehicles. The Senate took action on a new bill, SB 5476, to restore criminal penalties for drug possession in response to the state Supreme Court’s “Blake” ruling in February that struck down Washington’s law on drug possession. The House voted last Sunday to pass SB 5044, to make training on cultural, ethnic and racial diversity mandatory for school board principals, district staff and school staff. The lengthy debate included an amendment by Rep. Jim Walsh, R-Aberdeen, to ban specified training content, which was defeated by a rare recorded roll-call vote that is highlighted in this report. Amendments are usually approved or rejected by voice vote.

Senate Bill 5044, Concerning Professional Learning, Equity, Cultural Competence, and Dismantling Institutional Racism in the Public School System, was passed by the House on April 11 with a 57 to 40 vote. , one member being excused.

This bill would add equity, diversity, inclusion and anti-racism to existing cultural competency standards and training for school board principals, district staff and school staff. It would encourage school districts to prioritize one of the three days of professional learning to focus on these topics first. The program would require each of Washington’s 295 school districts to adopt the training. None of the mandates proposed in the bill would apply to private schools, homeschooling or non-public online education programs. The bill passed the Senate with a 30-19 vote in January. Since the House passed a striking amendment by the House Appropriations Committee, the bill is now sent to the Senate for adoption.

Representative Joel McEntire, R-Cathlamet – Excused

Rep. Jim Walsh, R-Aberdeen – No

Rep. Peter Abbarno, R-Centralia – No

Rep. Ed Orcutt, R-Kalama – No

Senate Bill 5044, an amendment proposed by Representative Jim Walsh to ban certain content from mandatory fairness training, failed in the House on April 11 by a vote of 39 to 58, with one member excused.

The proposed amendment would amend the bill by clarifying that governance training programs, curricula, requirements and other activities leading to the certification of educators, and opportunities for training, professional development and professional learning of school district personnel may contain, any of the nine topics listed, for example: one race or gender is inherently superior to another, the United States is inherently racist or sexist, and any other form of racist stereotype or sexual or scapegoat. Defines the terms “racial or sexual stereotypes” and “racial or sexual scapegoats”. The amendment was not adopted.

Representative Joel McEntire, R-Cathlamet – Excused

Rep. Jim Walsh, R-Aberdeen – Yes

Rep. Peter Abbarno, R-Centralia – Yes

Rep. Ed Orcutt, R-Kalama – Yes

Senate Bill 5476, responding to the State v. Blake in addressing the justice system responses and behavioral health prevention, treatment and services, was passed by the Senate on April 15 by a 28-20 vote with one member excused.

As passed, the bill would reduce the criminal penalty for possession of a controlled substance from a felony to a serious misdemeanor. The bill was introduced by majority Democrats in response to the state Supreme Court’s “Blake” ruling in February that struck down Washington’s current drug possession law. The original bill provided for the outright decriminalization of personal drug possession, allowing possession of specified amounts of drugs, including narcotics such as oxycodone, heroin and methamphetamine. A striking amendment that would reduce penalties for possession was passed, however, and the bill passed by a split vote, with 15 Democrats and 13 Republicans voting in favor. Eleven Democrats, including the sponsors of the original bill, voted against. The bill has been sent to the House Appropriations Committee where a public hearing is scheduled for April 19.

Sen. John Braun, R-Centralia – Yes

Senator Jeff Wilson, R-Longview – No

House Bill 1287, regarding preparing for an emissions-free transportation future, was passed by the Senate on April 10 by a 25-23 vote, with one member being excused.

As amended and passed by the Senate, this bill would establish a target that all passenger and light utility vehicles owned by the public and private sector of model year 2030 or later sold, purchased or registered in the Washington State to be electric vehicles, subject to the vehicle’s participation in a new highway user charge or tax or equivalent charge policy The original bill was intended only to prepare the state for a future of vehicles fully electric by forcing the Washington State Department of Transportation to create tools to map charging and refueling infrastructure to support predicted levels of electric vehicle adoption, movement and use. He also demanded electric utilities to analyze how their resource plans take into account expected levels of zero-emission vehicle use and information from the utility’s transportation electrification plans. These requirements are also provided for in the bill passed in the Senate.

Senator John Braun, R-Centralia – No

Senator Jeff Wilson, R-Longview – No

House Bill 1287, regarding Preparing for an Emissions-Free Transportation Future, was passed in the House when it was finally passed on April 14 by a vote of 54 to 43, with one MP being excused.

The House approved the Senate amendment that set a target for all passenger and light utility vehicles of model year 2030 or higher sold in Washington state as electric vehicles. With final passage through both chambers, the bill is now directed to the governor’s office for signature or veto.

Representative Joel McEntire, R-Cathlamet – No

Rep. Jim Walsh, R-Aberdeen – No

Rep. Peter Abbarno, R-Centralia – No

Rep. Ed Orcutt, R-Kalama – No

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